May 10, 2017

From The Metal Archives Vol 6 - Moribund Records

[When I add labels to the Metal Labels on Bandcamp page I usually scan their releases looking for anything interesting I might have missed. The reviews on The Metal Archives are a great help when doing this: a couple of great reviews
By the reviewers from The Metal Archives.

[When I add labels to the Metal Labels on Bandcamp page I usually scan their releases looking for anything interesting I might have missed. The reviews on The Metal Archives are a great help when doing this: a couple of great reviews means an album I should probably check out. With this series I'd like to share some of my finds - in this edition we feature three quite different releases from Moribund Records, that just celebrated "24 years of the Devils Metal".]

Cover art by Marcelo HCV.

Slowly crawling walls of orchestration are created through synthesizers, and over this he layers plucky, often strange, distorted guitars that hover below the bombastic string sections, ethereal female tones that hover at the edge of perception, and a mix of diabolic rasps and male choirs. Together these elements crash like the waves of warring shores throughout history and space, across various epochs and realms of possibility. It's an alien, complex emotional onslaught that is anchored only by the mighty weight of the symphonic ballast. 55 minutes of riveting obscurity that should silence skeptics of such extreme and unorthodox brilliance. [read autothrall's full review here]



As "Breathless" opens this album, the process of gradually unleashing this albums demons begin. There are already numerous things going on beneath the layer of seemingly chaotic distortion. The bass, for example, is bombastically mesmerising its victims, luring them to an early grave with their demonic and hypnotic musings. The bass is an integral part of Death Obsession and should be single out for praise by every reviewer who even dares to touch this album. As a long-time fan of black metal, I assume, neigh, I expect the bass to be omitted from proceedings. Most black metal musicians don’t seem too fussed about harnessing the subtle creativity and dynamism of the glorious bass. The bass is probably my favourite instrument, so I was bound to love this album. [read Perplexed_Sjel's full review here]


Cover art by Joe Petagno.

The recent excitement about Satan's Host is that in 2011 Harry Conklin came back after Jag Panzer's recent break up. It is not uncommon nowadays for a classic, underground band to resurface in the digital age and sound just as amazing as they did before. But in this case, the story is different: they actually sound better than before. And that is what brings us to By the Hands of the Devil, the first album with this lineup. One could have expected them to just go back to the classic “true” metal style that has become more prevalent in the past decade, and that could have been cool. However, they could not deny their black metal resurgence, so one would think there is an impasse. On the one hand you got a band that has been playing black metal for the past ten plus years, and on the other hand one of the most memorable and beloved vocalists of the heavy metal/power metal world. So, what do they decide to do? Of course...mix power metal with black metal, duh!

Yes, if we are fixated with putting names on things, the best description for what you hear in this album is just that: blackened power metal. You may ask: is that even possible?! Well, don't ask me and listen. [read EspadaNegra's full review here]

Tagged with 2009, 2010, 2011, atmospheric black metal, black metal, blackened heavy metal, Brown Jenkins, doom metal, I Shalt Become, Moribund Records, power metal, Satan's Host, symphonic black metal
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