Thursday, May 26, 2016

Entropia - Ufonaut

By Ulla Roschat. Ufonaut is like a swarm of bees on a psychedelic trip, hysterically energetic and intense, a mix of overwhelming, frenzied complexity and a melodic and rhythmic catchiness
By Ulla Roschat

Artwork by Kuba Sokólski

Ufonaut is like a swarm of bees on a psychedelic trip, hysterically energetic and intense, a mix of overwhelming, frenzied complexity and a melodic and rhythmic catchiness that is extremely compelling from the very beginning to its end.

Five piece band Entropia from Oleśnica/Poland blend sludge, psychedelic, and post metal elements into their black metal and ... abracadabra... out comes a magic potion that melts your brain as well as it crushes your skull before you even know what's happening here. But don't worry, as I said above, it's extremely compelling and that will keep you coming back and hit the play button again and again and everything begins to open up to you.

There's a black metal fury combined with a post metal ambience and psychedelic, often dissonant melodies embedded and woven into intricate structures with breathtakingly dynamic riffage and drumming. Vocals are used moderately and kept low in the mix to great effect. They sound like almost drowning in the instrumental massiveness and this way add a great sense of eerieness and despair to the already haunting and crazed out atmosphere.

Ufonaut is an excellent follow up to Entropia's debut album Vesper(2013). The CD version contains 7 songs and is about 43 minutes long, the vinyl version has an additional bonus track, which is also available as digital track on the band's Bandcamp.

The song "Apogeum" is featured on The Wicked Lady Show 107


Sunday, May 22, 2016

Short and to the point 4

By Aaron Sullivan. First up is a band from my local scene, Deathkings. Their second album All That Is Beautiful is one that I have been anticipating for some time. Finally hearing it in full, I was not let down
By Aaron Sullivan.


First up is a band from my local scene, Deathkings. Their second album All That Is Beautiful is one that I have been anticipating for some time. Finally hearing it in full, I was not let down.

Thier sound is that of progressive Sludge. Songs are epic each one their own journey. What really comes across is the weight of the music. Heavy comes in many forms. The easiest is to downtune, amp up, and turn it up to 11. But to achieve heaviness without doing that is what this album has in spades. Even in the quiet moments it still feels heavy. Emotionally and sonically.



Cover art by Yag Mort

In an effort of full disclosure, I had never heard of Australia's Ill Omen until I saw this album posted on instagram. So I thought I’d check it out. Damn glad I did. Within two songs I was on the NWN web site and ordering the album.

As I said I am not familiar with this one man band’s past albums, so while Ill Omen may be categorized as Black Metal, Æ.Thy.Rift plays much more like a Death/DOOM album. In fact the first band that came to my mind was Nortt. This album has atmosphere for days. The vocals are a mix or whispered screams and gurgling growls. The music is dark and brooding. I love when you take a chance on an album and it pays off.




Been on a bit of an experimental/noise/ambient trip as of late and because of that been going to a lot of shows that feature this type of music. A few weeks back I was treated to the sounds of Wire Werewolves. I was blown away.

They mix experimental noise, hints of industrial, and Death Metal style riffing. Vocals are provided by clips taken from news show about murder and satanic rituals. They do a great job of balancing these different genres. The coldness of the industrial and these sublime death metal riffs. They prove once again why you show up for all the bands. Never know what you might be surprised by.




"Burnt out bangers from the shit end of the valley." Well that is one way to describe L.A.’s three piece Child. Another way would be to call them some good old Stoner/DOOM with hints of psychedelia. In the vein of Kyuss and Yawning Man.

Songs have a haze about them usually achieved by the help of mind altering substances. Fat bluesy riffs with an even fatter bass lines. Vocals that are drenched in reverb. Nothing fancy. They just keep it simple. But in that simplicity they achieve so much.




From the land of 10,000 lakes come Livid and their two song demo of DOOMY goodness, Sint.

It opens with a this thick crunchy bass line that is hypnotic and heavy at the same time. It lays a foundation that allows the guitars to kind of dance around. But what really sets them apart is the approach to the vocals. This type of DOOM is usually met with harsh vocals. But they go the other way. His have this epic gothy feel to them. They are like the light leading you through the muck and the mire. Very impressive debut.


Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Vektor - Terminal Redux

By Nate Garrett. Fans of Vektor have been waiting for Terminal Redux. It’s been five years since the release of the band’s previous effort, Outer Isolation. By that time, Vektor had firmly established itself as a distinctive force in the realm of heavy music. The motto “sci-fi or die” united metalheads, heshers, punks, skaters, bloggers, and all walks of weirdos around the world.
By Nate Garrett.

Artwork by Adam Burke.

Fans of Vektor have been waiting for Terminal Redux. It’s been five years since the release of the band’s previous effort, Outer Isolation. By that time, Vektor had firmly established itself as a distinctive force in the realm of heavy music. The motto “sci-fi or die” united metalheads, heshers, punks, skaters, bloggers, and all walks of weirdos around the world. Vektor brought people together. This rabid following was hard-earned and well-deserved. But five years is plenty of time for a fanbase to lose interest these days. Conversely, five years is also more than enough time for anticipation to run rampant, for expectations to reach levels that can’t possibly be fulfilled. Fortunately, on May 6, the release of Terminal Redux proved one thing. No matter how high a Vektor fan’s expectations were for this album, there is an infinitesimal chance that they won’t be exceeded.

David DiSanto, 2012. Photo © John Mourlas. All rights reserved.

Opening track “Charging the Void” beckons the listener with an ominous intro that is swiftly vaporized by the band’s rocket-fueled attack. It’s evident immediately that we’re strapped in for another frenetic, mind-warping trip through the cosmos. What isn’t as obvious at first is that this album has more to offer than any thrash metal release has provided in decades. The stunning technical proficiency is present, and it’s somehow even more impressively precise than ever. Yet there’s more. Toward the three-quarter mark of this song, a confident sense of melody weaves its way into the sonic stratosphere. Suddenly vocalist/guitarist David DiSanto’s unearthly howls are met by a strange, angelic chorus, and the entire affair transforms into something wholly uplifting. Vektor’s music has always possessed a sort of energizing positivity, but this is beyond that. This is legitimately beautiful. It’s new territory for the band, and indicative of the compelling experience that awaits the listener on the rest of the album. Vektor has always been an ambitious presence amongst its peers, and with Terminal Redux the band has become totally uninhibited.

Blake Anderson, 2012. Photo © John Mourlas. All rights reserved.

“Cygnus Terminal” begins with an eerie, enticing clean section reminiscent of the most forward-thinking of the classic thrash bands. This intro wouldn’t be entirely out of place on Ride The Lightning or The New Order, but at once is utterly Vektor. When the song takes off, it’s now undeniable that the band is intent upon delivering relentlessly catchy hooks, not only from the guitars, but from the rhythm section as well. As far as vocals go, DiSanto sounds more unhinged than ever, yet also more in control of his voice. He’s delivering his trademark mid-range growls with conviction, confidently experimenting with clean vocals (they work), and unleashing impossibly high shrieks that at times achieve unison with the wailing lead guitar. Bassist Frank Chin is also throwing caution to the void, flawlessly gliding through tasteful runs that are reminiscent of Cliff Burton, never excessive or masturbatory. These bass lines establish an undercurrent of tragedy, a hook beneath the equally melancholic yet catchy guitar interplay of DiSanto and Erik Nelson. It’s a given that drummer Blake Anderson has practiced along with these songs for countless hours, as he instinctively locks in with the bass runs or highlights the accents of the guitar parts, depending on what best serves the mood of the song. These first two offerings are testaments to the fact that this band has been playing together for a long time. These musicians possess the intuition and tangible magic that can only be attained through experience. They’re poised, channeling the same wavelength, and more adventurous than ever.

Erik Nelson, 2012. Photo © John Mourlas. All rights reserved.

A track-by-track analysis of Terminal Redux would be a disservice to every potential listener. There are too many special moments lurking within, and part of the pure joy of listening to this album is the unexpected nature in which these moments reveal themselves. That being said, the rest of the songs on this album continue to pull the listener into a chaotic yet fully-realized vortex of brutally infectious riffs, spectacular musicianship, and brilliant songwriting. It’s all guided by an orbiting lunatic who waxes poetic within a surreal, inventive science fiction storyline. On Terminal Redux, Vektor reaches previously uncharted depths of heaviness, as well as unimagined heights of melody and sincerity.

Frank Chin, 2012. Photo © John Mourlas. All rights reserved.

It’s becoming increasingly difficult to create something unique in any genre, without resorting to methods that are pretentious, misguided, or distractingly bizarre. Particularly within a genre like thrash metal, where membership cards are constantly questioned and sonic boundaries are strictly established, experimentation can be risky. Vektor manages to break the rules with grace and earnestness, while upholding and expanding upon the beloved spirit of the genre. The band’s approach is never forced or awkward, it flows naturally with a mature cohesion. The scope and ambition of Terminal Redux is astounding, but that doesn’t detract from the focused nature of the songwriting. Few bands are ever able to create an album that is this technically proficient and heavy, yet this profoundly moving and memorable. Vektor has accomplished precisely that. Terminal Redux launches this already great band into timeless territory. If you’re a fan of heavy music, you owe it to yourself to listen to this album. More than likely, you’ll be enjoying and analyzing it in equal doses for many years to come.



Nate is Spirit Adrift, and plays guitar in Take Over And Destroy and Gatecreeper.