Saturday, May 17, 2014

Dephosphorus - Ravenous Solemnity

Written by Matt Hinch.

Artwork by Viral Graphics

There may be a Greek Orthodox Church but there's nothing orthodox about the mayhem of Greek grind crew Desphosphorus. These progenitors of the term “astrogrind” take the base of grind and subject it to enough cosmic radiation that the resulting mutations spliced into Ravenous Solemnity present a fearsome yet inviting amalgamation of extremities.

Desperate and pained screams wreak auditory havoc with a tortured and strangled viciousness over a mixture of blackened grind and sludgeoned noise. The elasticity of their compositions pushes at the limits of comprehension. The tracks turn in on themselves, shooting off in different directions with dizzying inertial violence.

All the speed of grind, black metal and even thrash fire the afterburners into the chaos of a magnetically unstable asteroid field. At every swerve a new riff, time signature or atmosphere careens into your field of hearing. The damage sustained from the devastating impact of an array of sickeningly catchy riffs and gut-wrenching grooves is readily absorbed.

An appreciable amount of technicality lifts Dephosphorus above the trappings of mere speed. Not to mention the dynamic changes from mind-blurring velocity to mid-paced castigation, doomy atmospherics or noisy discordance that are executed with the utmost precision and not the faintest hint of anything but elite craftsmanship. The pilots of the good ship Dephosphorus know exactly what they are doing. Their absurd complexity is naturally organic and at no time feels forced.

Vacuous grooves and icy blasts implode and explode; the compression and expansion radiating a seething malice from a dark atomic core. The frantic intensity of this stellar LP may burn hot but the nuclear entropy is controlled so that the embers set ablaze continue to smoulder long after the void has been crossed.

[Go to the post to view the Bandcamp player]

Tagged with 2014, black metal, death metal, Dephosphorus, grindcore, Matt Hinch
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