Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Hollow Leg - Crown

By Karen A. Mann. With two full-length releases and one single under their belt, Jacksonville, Florida’s Hollow Leg have gained a significant following with their heavy-hitting brand of groovy sludge. Originally a guitar-and-drums duo, the band is now a well-honed quartet and a beast live.
By Karen A. Mann.

Album art by Maz Armageddon

With two full-length releases and one single under their belt, Jacksonville, Florida’s Hollow Leg have gained a significant following with their heavy-hitting brand of groovy sludge. Originally a guitar-and-drums duo, the band is now a well-honed quartet and a beast live. They were one of my personal highlights of the recent Maryland Doom Fest. On Crown, the band branches out, exploring their bluesy roots in surprising ways and adding a bit of psychedelic drama to their swampy brand of doom.

The first song, “Seaquake,” stomps out of the gate with a punching riff and gives the listener a good taste of what’s to be found on Crown. Singer Scott Angelacos angrily sings about cursing the flesh and shaking the sea in a Matt Pike-worthy bellow. Brent Lynch’s delay-drenched way guitar gives the song a spacey, psychedelic feel.

Photos by Karen

The remainder of the album sees the band alternately slow and lumbering, and angrily charging. They even go full acoustic on the instrumental “Atra,” which combines handclaps and a hypnotic blues riff in a spellbinding way. As might be expected from a band that operates in the same fertile ground that spawned both Lynyrd Skynyrd and The Allman Brothers, there’s always a heavy head-bobbing groove simmering underneath. All these ingredients blend together perfectly on what’s perhaps the album’s best song, “Seven Heads,” which mixes hypnotic hooks, a crushing rhythm and abrasive vocals.

Crown was released on CD in March by Italian label Argonauta Records. The song “Coils” also appears on Argonauta’s just-released summer sampler, Devouring the Mountains Vol. III.


Tagged with 2016, doom metal, Hollow Leg., Karen A. Mann, sludge metal
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